Exclusive Articles
The Record-Breaking Career of Frank Thomas Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Thursday, 01 August 2013

 

One of the superstars of baseball during the 1990s, Frank Thomas was the 21st player in the history of MLB to reach the 500-homer mark. He is one of the few players, apart from Babe Ruth, Mel Ott, Jimmie Foxx, Willie Mays, Ted Williams, Manny Ramirez, and Alex Rodrigues to score 500 homers as well as maintain a batting average of .300 or more over the course of his career. Thomas is also among the few players, apart from Barry Bonds, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Mel Ott, and Babe Ruth who have scored 500 home runs during their career while accruing more than 1600 bases on balls. During 1993-1994, Thomas created history when he became the first MLB player to bag two Silver Slugger prizes each while playing at two separate positions (first base during 1993-1994 and as designated hitter in 1991 and 2000).

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MACnificent Mark and the Steroids Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Thursday, 01 August 2013

Mark McGwire, nicknamed Big Mac, was born in California on the first of October 1963. Considered among the most prolific and powerful hitters in MLB history, he ended his 16-year long career with 583 home runs under his belt. McGwire made the All Star Team proud on twelve occasions. He won the World Series once, bagged the Silver Slugger prize thrice, and the Gold Glove honors, the Home Run Derby, as well as the Lou Gehrig Award once.

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A One-Club Man: Mel Ott Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Thursday, 01 August 2013

Melvin Ott, or Mel Ott as he was commonly known, spent his entire MLB career in New York where he featured for the Giants between 1926 and 1947. The right-handed thrower and left-handed batter was the first ever player in the National League to cross the 500 homer barrier. Although he was only 5'9" tall and weighed around 77 kilograms, Ott was a fantastic power hitter during his career on the ballpark. In 1951, he received 87 per cent of votes prior to his indictment into the game's Hall of Fame. His twenty-plus years of incredible service to the Giants was repaid by the club as they decided to retire his number 4 jersey.

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New Inductees into Hall of Fame Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Thursday, 01 August 2013

The end of this month will see one of the most glittering induction events in the history of Baseball Hall of Fame. The ceremony is set to include an iconic owner, a couple of the most prolific hitters ever in the game, a path breaking umpire, and many all time greats.

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Baseball Hall of Fame Releases New Logo on Their 74th Anniversary Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 28 June 2013

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum has unveiled a new logo to commemorate the institution's 75th anniversary next year. This is to mark the 74th anniversary celebrations for the organization going on in June 2013.

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Alex Rodriguez – The Rise and Fall Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 28 June 2013

Alex Rodriguez was one of the most promising stars of Baseball in his early years. Starting with the Seattle Mariners, Rodriguez first got a taste of success with the West Coast team. Today, the star's luster has dimmed out considerably due to his frequent appearance in the tabloids and his antics off the field. Even when he is off the field due to his hip injury, the negativity has ensued and his name is taken in dismissal tones now.

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Frank Robinson’s Remarkable Career Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 28 June 2013

Born on the 31st of August 1935, Frank Robinson was one of the greatest outfielders to play baseball. His career lasted for twenty one years and he is best remembered for his contributions to Baltimore Orioles and Cincinnati Reds. Robinson remains the sole player to bag MVP awards in the American as well as the National League. He finished as a World Series winner on two occasions, both with Baltimore Orioles. At the time of his retirement, he was fourth on the all-time home run scorers list, leading to his election to the sport’s Hall of Fame.

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Strength, Solidarity, and Loyalty – Harmon Killebrew’s MLB Career Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 28 June 2013

“Hammerin’ Harmon” or “Killer”, as he was nicknamed, Harmon Killebrew was a left fielder, third baseman, and first baseman who featured for only two clubs in the MLB. His career lasted 22 years and he played for Minnesota Twins for 21 of those seasons. He then moved to Kansas City and retired as a player for the Royals. At the time of his retirement, Killebrew was the second highest home run scorer in the American League behind Babe Ruth with 573 under his belt. He was also the right-handed career home run leader in the American League when he ended his career. In 1984, he entered into the Hall of Fame for his tremendous contributions to baseball.

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The Cuban Cigar that Never Went Out – Rafael Palmeiro Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 28 June 2013

Born in the capital city of Cuba on the 24th of September 1964, Rafael Palmeiro was a left fielder and first baseman who enjoyed a long and successful career in MLB. Having debuted in the American League with Chicago Cubs in 1986, he moved to Texas Rangers in 1989 after three seasons with the Cubs. In 1994, he transferred to Baltimore Orioles where he remained until 1998 before moving back to the Rangers and playing another four seasons there. He retired from the game after moving back to Baltimore in the 2004 season. Palmeiro has appeared in the All-Star line-up on four occasions, claiming the Golden Glove award thrice. He is one of only four players in baseball history to record 3000 hits and 500 homers. However, he tested positive for a banned substance and was banned few days after hitting his 3000th ball.

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A True Post-Season Great – Reggie Jackson Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 28 June 2013

Born in Pennsylvania on the 18th of May 1946, Reginald Martinez Jackson was a right fielder on the baseball pitch. His 21 year-long career in MLB was cherished by the fans and faithful of four different clubs between 1967 and 1987. Mr. October, as he was popularly known, Jackson made his mark on the game with some fine clutch hitting with the Yankees and Oakland A’s. Eleven of his 21 seasons ended with his team making it to the post-season as he was an influential figure in each season.

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Ernie Banks on His 40th Anniversary of Becoming MLB's First Black Manager Print E-mail
Written by 500 HRC   
Friday, 31 May 2013


"As athletes get older, their accomplishments become greater and greater as the years pass on.”

The words of Dereck Whittenburg from ESPN’s 30 for 30 documentary “Survive and Advance,” which chronicles Jimmy Valvano’s 1983 Wolfpack, ring true for all sports. Some moments become etched infinitely into the highlight reels of history, to be played over and over for generations to come.

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MLB Legends with 500 Home Runs to Their Credit Print E-mail
Written by Liz Banks   
Friday, 31 May 2013

 

Hundreds and thousands of ball players strive to score 500 home runs during the course of their career, but only the elite manage to make a strong statement. The milestone does not reward players with any specific awards. Instead, it is one of the achievements that have the potential to see a player inducted into the MLB Hall of Fame. As the years pass, the achievement of this goal has become increasingly significant, and players’ memorabilia shows are usually advertised for and conducted using their ‘500 Home Run Club’ member status.

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500 HRC Members Rocked the World (Series) Print E-mail
Written by Jim Rednour   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013

The greatest home run hitter in the history of the World Series was play 500 Home Run Club®Member Mickey Mantle. “The Mick” hit a total of 18 memorable dingers while leading his beloved Yankees to seven World Series titles.

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Fantastic Facts About 500 HRC Members Print E-mail
Written by Jim Rednour   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013

Willie MayesTwo 500 Home Run Club® members were among a select few MLB players to hit four home runs in a single game: Willie Mays (04-30-61) and Mike Schmidt (04-17-76) > only 15 players have ever achieved this feat. 

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Left or Right, Where's the Might? Print E-mail
Written by Jim Rednour   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013

500 Home Run Club® Members had tons of power Alright – or was it Left?

Bonds batting left handedWhen it came to choosing which side of the plate to bat from, you could say that the majority of the 500 Home Run Club® members LEFT nothing to chance - but only by the slimmest of margins. Of the 12,750+ long balls hit by 500 HRC sluggers, 6433 or 52% were hit by left-handed batters or switch hitters. Only 6317 or 48% were hit by righties.

This margin is much closer than it was one year ago, since three of the four All-Stars who joined The Club in 2007 (Alex Rodriguez, Frank Thomas and Manny Ramirez) are all right handed - adding 1566 right-handed long balls to the overall count.  Only Jim Thome is a lefty.

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Jackie Robinson: Batting Down Barriers Print E-mail
Written by Jim Rednour   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013

When viewed in retrospect, Jackie Robinson's achievements (both on and off the field) are monumental in both their scope and significance to "America's Game," as well as our society as a whole.

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Top 10 Reasons why You Can't Credit Steroids for the Increase Print E-mail
Written by David Vincent   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013

 In the mid-1990s, home run production increased dramatically. Many news stories, congressional hearings and water cooler conversations have tied this increase to the use of steroids and other drugs. However, science does not support this conclusion and there are many possible reasons for the increase in the home run production rate at the end of the 20th century.

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500HRC Members’ Long Tradition with the “Breakfast of Champions” Print E-mail
Written by Jim Rednour   
Wednesday, 01 May 2013

What began almost 80 years ago as a crispy whole-wheat cereal flake with a catchy ad slogan “The Breakfast of Champions” has grown into one of America's most celebrated sports icons.  The legendary cereal flake in the orange box was the first breakfast product to venture into the world of sports marketing, when in 1933. General Mills featured the first usage of the “Breakfast of Champions” tag line on the left field wall at old Nicollet Park in south Minneapolis.

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Get to Know the “Big Mac” of Major League Baseball: Willie McCovey Print E-mail
Written by Bryan W. Alaspa   
Monday, 01 April 2013

Willie Lee McCovey had a few nicknames during his time playing Major League Baseball.  He was known as "Mac" and his height earned him the nickname "Stretch."  However, most people probably remember him for being called "Big Mac" because, let's face it, the man was big.  He was a big man with power and fielding ability and he spent his career playing on the West Coast.  Now that the regular season is getting set to start, it is always interesting to look at the greatest players who have lived.  McCovey, just like all players, also showed up to spring training each year, just like players today.   It’s part of what made him so great.

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Remembering the man with the odd stance Mike Schmidt Print E-mail
Written by Bryan W. Alaspa   
Monday, 01 April 2013

There is little doubt that baseball player Mike Schmidt had some of the most impressive numbers when it comes to belting the ball out of the park, but those who played against him and saw him play may always remember him for the way he stood at the plate.  In the end, although the way in which he did stand was odd, it helped him in his hitting and truly threw off the pitchers he faced.  Now that spring training is ending, it is always interesting to look back at the all-time greats, those who made names for themselves by not only playing during the regular season, but sharpening their skills during spring training.

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He Was Known as "The Killer", Harmon Killebrew Print E-mail
Written by Bryan W. Alaspa   
Monday, 01 April 2013

Baseball players earn their nicknames.  Most of them have all kinds of names, some of them famous, some of them not so famous. Harmon Killebrew was known as "The Killer" and you might be thinking that it has to do with his last name. Well, that would be right in part, but it would not be the whole story.  No, Harmon Killebrew was famous for "killing" his opponents both with his hitting and his fielding.  Now that spring training is coming to an end and the regular season is set to start in the majors, it is important to look back at the greatest players, like The Killer, those who showed up each year to spring training with high expectations and a desire to improve.

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